Permission sought for observatory atop Colorado's Pikes Peak

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Astronomy enthusiasts are seeking permission to build an observatory atop Colorado's Pikes Peak.

The National Space Science and Technology Institute based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, recently submitted an application to the U.S. Forest Service.

Putting an observatory atop the 14,115-foot mountain has been discussed for decades. The Colorado Springs Gazette reports (http://bit.ly/2yAOVuZ) the proposal has faced one setback after another, including hesitation by government officials to allow new uses of the mountain.

Supporters say the observatory would be the most heavily visited in the U.S. Hundreds of thousands of people visit Pikes Peak every year.

The Forest Service as well as Colorado Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service will take part in analyzing the proposal.

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Information from: The Gazette, http://www.gazette.com

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